Tag Archives: silence

Preparation

Thursday 31 December 

I have two different ways of preparing for celebrating a Eucharist.

During the week and at the early Sunday service at St. Peter’s, I robe early and go and sit and wait as worshippers arrive. At the main service on a Sunday I wait at the back and greet people as they come into church.

Both forms of preparation are significant. The first is ‘my’ time and spreads to those who gather. Catching up is done at the end. However the at the back welcome is equally important and has something to do with linking together of the much larger gathering; I have spoken to nearly everyone beforehand and there is an integration achieved through this contact. Late or on the cusp arrival don’t glean this connection to the celebrant, but ho hum you can’t win them all.

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On peace…..

9th March 2015

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In the time of lent we are reminded to clear space to search for and move closer to God. Richard Coles Says:

“I felt then as I feel now in an empty church, a release from anxiety, a sense of peace, a refuge from trials….”

Fathomless Riches – The Revd Richard Coles p18

For some of us the place we find rest and peace is a church; for others the top of a hill, the banks of a river, a chair by the fire. During Lent let us remember and seek out the places where we find rest and peace.

Let us cultivate times of quiet to be with God and to hear him.

Sam Crook – Huddersfield Parish Church

Words Worth Thinking About.

Sam Wells told clergy at the Wakefield Diocesan Clergy Conference that there were three types of power; the power of silence, the power of words and the power of touch.

He spoke to a rarefied group of individuals:

“Your first duty as a priest is to save your own soul.” The second foundation of ministry is just as eschatological but nothing like so personal. It pictures judgement day and Christ the King in glory, and asks the question, “What will we say to him if we stand before him without the others?”

This is the paradoxical foundation of ministry. Your first duty is to save your own soul. But ask yourself what he will say to you if you go to him without the others.

His whole lecture was breathtaking and you could have heard a pin drop as he spoke and shared his insight.

Read the whole text Sam Wells told clergy at the Wakefield Diocesan Clergy Conference that there were three types of power; the power of silence, the power of words and the power of touch.

He spoke to a rarefied group of individuals:

“Your first duty as a priest is to save your own soul.” The second foundation of ministry is just as eschatological but nothing like so personal. It pictures judgement day and Christ the King in glory, and asks the question, “What will we say to him if we stand before him without the others?”

This is the paradoxical foundation of ministry. Your first duty is to save your own soul. But ask yourself what he will say to you if you go to him without the others.

His whole lecture was breathtaking and you could have heard a pin drop as he spoke and shared his insight.

Read the whole text http://www.wakefield.anglican.org/news/story/revd_dr_sam_wells_lecture_from_the_clergy_conference