Tag Archives: pray

Extra-Ordinary 

5. An angel, called Gabriel, came to visit Mary. He said to her, “You will have God’s baby, and will name him Jesus.”

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After the ordinary the extra-ordinary. To hope or expect the extra-ordinary is not really a modern state. We are far too practical and logical to expect God breaking into life in such a prominent way. Prophets and seers are held at sceptical arms length.

Yet those who constantly proclaim God’s Kingdom still live and breath in this generation. I am not talking about the shouters on street corners or those who announce God’s doom. Jesus spoke of cups of water given, children cared for and prisoners visited. Look for and practice generosity, caring and visiting – be a present day angel proclaiming Christ’s kingdom.

Who will I give, care for or visit today. Pray and act afterward.

Preparing Gracefully

Monday 21 November

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Advent you may know is a season of preparing; indeed the special prayer for Advent Sunday at its heart simply asks for ‘grace’ from God to be ready.

Ready – by laying time aside to talk with Jesus, reading his Good News and establishing the rule hope for the day. Look at the news and pray God into that situation – pray for grace to inhabit and tend. Ask Jesus why! Seek a response of hope, if not directly in yourself then through other.

Grace to prepare in hope.

Help us today and every day to worship you,  to hear your word, and to place you in the  centre, help us to share your hope with others. We ask it in the name of the one who was born in Bethlehem. Amen.

Ash Wednesday Commitment

Wednesday 10 February

What is an Ash Wednesday commitment?

As in a confirmation there is a call to the participants to be different – and in terms of Jesus – praying, thinking and doing. We are not asked to move mountains or fast for forty days but look to God and neighbour with Christ-eyes.

Praying, thinking and doing, where will your gentle commitment be this Lent?

Help Me.

16th February 2015

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After her business goes bust, a desperate lady resorts to praying. ‘God please help me;’ she wails. ‘I’ve lost my business, and if I don’t get some money, I’m going to lose everything. Please let me win the lottery’.

Saturday night comes and goes, someone else, and not her, wins the jackpot.

Soon she prays again, ‘God , please let me win the lottery, only you can save me. Along comes the weekend, another draw, and no luck at all.

Once again she prays. ‘God, why haven’t you helped me? She cries angrily. I’ve always been a good servant to you—PLEASE let me win just this once, so that I can get my life back in order.

Suddenly, there is a blinding flash of light as the heavens open and she is confronted with such a vision beyond imagination—and the vision speaks—God booms: my dear one, meet me half way on this. Please buy a ticket!!!

That will be something of a theme in the Lenten season. God saying meet me half way. It seems a perhaps stale saying but if we can look to even inching closer to God, then I’m sure that we will not be let down with the results.

The Rev’d Canon Simon Moor – Vicar of Huddersfield Parish Church

Conversation.

14th February 2015

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Another interpretation I have heard used for the first chapter of the Gospel of St. John is using ‘conversation’ instead of the ‘Logos’ or ‘Word’.

This interpretation doesn’t give a complete translations but makes you think.

In the beginning was the Conversation, and the Conversation was with God, and the Conversation was God. The Conversation was with God in the beginning.

The Conversation became flesh and made his dwelling among us. We have seen his glory, the glory of the one and only Son, who came from the Father, full of grace and truth.

When we pray, we indeed become part of that conversation.

The Rev’d Canon Simon Moor – Vicar of Huddersfield Parish Church

Relief or regret?

Morning Prayers completed and I wait for the turning of the hour. Apprehensive, arrow prayers shoot up through the ceiling.

A date and time arranged late yesterday. A man barely forty – yet looking sixty. Full of the wine the newest bottle he waves about. He cries for his innocence, bewailing the abuse he is given in the town and wearing the badge of a black eye where he has responded to taunts.

Will he return, sober and yet without the passion of feeling for his state and reaction? Does his wine dull or enflame?

Way past 9.15am and arrow prayers shoot up through the ceiling. Relief or regret?