Tag Archives: love

Easter People

Readings for Easter Sunday

Acts 10.34-43, Colossians 3.1-4; and Matthew 28.1-10

45

Wednesday 19 April

What does it mean to be an “Easter People”? It means firstly to be people who have met with the Risen Jesus and begun to experience new life through the gift of the Holy Spirit. It means to be people who are beginning to live in hope and not fear – and who bring that hope to the people they meet and the places they live and work. Paul’s words “set your minds on things that are above, not on things that are on the earth” doesn’t mean that we are to be so heavenly minded that we are of no earthly use – rather it means that we are to live by different priorities than those of the world around us. We are to be ambitious, not for the things of this world but for God’s priorities of faith, hope and love.

Question: What could you do to bring God’s priorities of faith, hope and love to the places you will be and the people you will meet today?

 Prayer: Lord, thank you for the new life you have given me in Christ. Show me how I can share that life with others today.

 

Alone?

Easter Eve

42

Saturday 15 April

Silence and sadness for he is gone. Everyone who claimed to know, claimed to love Him have run away and hidden. Those who remained, took Jesus’ body for burial and rested for it was the sabbath. Can you imagine a world without Jesus? No remembering, no repeating, no trying to live up to His love for humanity? The first Easter-eve Jesus lay in a stone tomb, his friends mourned the waste and contemplated such an irredeemable future. They didn’t even hope for the rising of Jesus. How strangely empty that day must have been, how utterly empty of a future it must have been.

Prayer: My crucified Lord, in the depths of the isolation I may feel, my cry is to you. Lord God, give light in my darkness and bring me out of the prison of my despair; through the same crucified Jesus Christ. Amen

 

 

Wash Me!?

Holy Week

Tuesday 11 April

A washing of his friends’ feet, as if they were more  important than He. On one hand menial and on the other it shows Jesus incarnation. He was38hed and dried and showed how we should be with one another, regardless of status or rank. Peter’s false modesty and great expectation of Jesus indicates something of our human frailty as we shy away from God’s gaze and yet desire encounters of his love and grace.

Question: Where will I seek opportunity to ‘wash’ someone else today?

 Prayer: Lord, place in my way today someone in need, give me the   opportunity to commit a random act of kindness. Amen

 

 

Barabbas

Readings for Palm Sunday

Isaiah 50:4-9, Philippians 2:5-115: 1-11 and Matthew 27:11-54

35

Friday 7th April

Who do we want released to fight our cause? When we feel wronged by another person would we campaign for the  release of a freedom fighter, a great lawyer , a politician? Or would we want Jesus to be released to call us to love in the face of persecution, to love those who abused us and our religion? Which force do we want to release in our lives and into the world? “The governor again said to them, ‘Which of the two do you want me to release for you?’ And they said, ‘Barabbas.’ ”

 

 

Readings for 3rd Sunday in Lent

Exodus 17: 1-7, Romans 5: 1-11 & John 4: 5-42

18Saturday 18th March

What happens to us when God breaks the rules? We are called as Christian people to model our behaviour on the behaviour of Christ. What a challenge! I wonder if an alien arrived in our parishes this Sunday, and was asked to imagine Jesus based on the behaviour of his present-day disciples, what conclusions that alien might draw?

Perhaps that the Jesus we follow was a nice comfortable chap who liked to sit in big buildings once a week? Perhaps that the Jesus we follow was a sensible, common sense sort, who would like to hope for the wonderful, but generally expects the slightly below par, with a small dose of cynicism and a bucket of pragmatism thrown in. But of course that is not the Jesus we try to follow. That Jesus would surely never have chosen the cross. But our Jesus did – chose the outrageous, dangerous, glorious expression of ultimate love – so   that our faith and love for God could transcend what we have  been told, what we have inherited. So that we might truly be  liberated to follow the Saviour of the world.

Question: How do our lives reflect the way Jesus lived?

 Prayer: Freedom-giving God, loose the chains of habit and culture that bind us to false religion. Set us free to follow the earth-changing ways of your Son, our Saviour, Jesus Christ. Amen.

 

Willingly

Readings for 3rd Sunday in Lent

Exodus 17: 1-7, Romans 5: 1-11 & John 4: 5-42

15

Wednesday 15th March

So beset by our quarrels, our worst brought out of us by our fears, and wondering where we are on our journey, this Sunday St Paul delivers the tonic we need. Bringing us back from wallowing in what is wrong – with the world, with our little corner of it or with ourselves – we are reminded of what we need. What we need is hope – and hope whose foundations lay not in our own navigational skills for the journey, and not in our own ability to rise unaided above our human condition. Hope based on the sacrifice of Jesus. We stand in grace.

We hope not in spite of the difficulties and struggles of being human, but we hope through our struggles because of the love which God has poured into our hearts.

We did not earn the sacrifice which Christ willingly made for us – but still he made it. We didn’t even repent first. God did not blackmail or cajole us into our salvation. While we were still sinners, God gave everything, willingly and without reservation, for love of us.

Question: When we see ourselves in this light, see our value to the God of all creation, how will we respond?

 Prayer: Loving God, help me to see my value as you see it today. Give me hope in my struggles, and help me to follow you. Amen.

 

Famished

 

Readings for 1st Sunday in Lent

 

Genesis 2:15-17; 3:1-7, Romans 5:12-19; and Matthew 4: 1-11

4

 

Thursday 2 March

We are told that Jesus was ‘famished’ after his time alone in the wilderness. Have you ever been ‘famished’ and I don’t mean hungry for a meal.

The account of Jesus in the wilderness is fundamentally about Jesus’ lack of relationship, with other people and with God.

Jesus is then tempted to self sufficiency and testing of his Father’s  love and care. Lent for me is being hungry enough to seek God, to seek forgiveness and through small steps of seeking realise the Father’s love and care.

Prayer: O most approachable Father, through my thoughts, my prayers and study of Jesus and his guidance may I grow ever closer to your love and care in this world. Amen