Tag Archives: belief

A Speeding Train

Wednesday 9 March

Our Lenten speakers last week were scientists, a medic and a mathematician. Each of the individuals were contrary to Dawkins and able to tie their faith with their specialism. 
Maths and faith – a fundamental likeness. You are on the train called maths or faith and the countryside of understanding slips by smoothly and serenely. You are at one with the concepts.

But track-side, and Dawkin-esk, you see a blur rushing by and denounce that this thing called a train even exists.

Walk with God and there is recognition of the divine and self.

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More Palatable? 

Sunday 28 February 

Robin Gamble talked in respect of David Bowie ‘s life and talent.

It was identified  that there seemed a reluctance for some, Bowie included to move into a solely atheistic mode of life because, a leap of unfaithful is bigger and darker than a leap of faith.
In other words there is often sentiment or strong feeling that while ‘I don’t believe in God, I don’t believe in ‘not God’ more strongly.

We quickly move into a discussion of an idea that we need to be a friend of God. This means being a friend of God rather than bowing before the transcendent.

More palatable?

    

Everyday God

25th February 2015

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Everyday God a short book by Father George Guiver of the Community of the Resurrection, Mirfield, West Yorkshire

‘The Creed starts, I believe in….’. It does not start ‘I believe that…’ In other words it does not ask us for an opinion about ideas. It is an invitation to trust a person’. To trust a person, we need to know them. To know God we need to talk with him in prayer as we would to anyone we are trying to get to know.

George Guiver puts things in such a practical manner, so much sensible & easily understood advice.

The next few day focus on some of the themes from this approachable and accessible book.

The Rev’d Canon Simon Moor – Vicar of Huddersfield Parish Church

Watch and wonder!

4th February 2014

wonder-cover

The account of the Wedding at Cana concludes with the acknowledgement that what Jesus did in there was the first of the signs through which his disciples believed in him.

Jesus wasn’t quite ready to reveal himself at this wedding but did so. We may not see such miraculous events in our time, but then we are in a sceptical age.

Watch and wonder!

The Rev’d Canon Simon Moor – Vicar of Huddersfield Parish Church